Contents
  1. NAPOLEON BONAPARTE: England's Prisoner
  2. Napoleon Bonaparte Books
  3. Napoleon Bonaparte - Reading A-Z
  4. The Reign Of Napoleon Bonaparte

More books have been written with Napoleon in the title than there have been days since his death in ” Napoleon: A life by Andrew. reiposavovta.cf: The Reign Of Napoleon Bonaparte (): Robert Asprey: Books. A definitive biography of Bonaparte from his birth in Corsica to his death in exile on St Helena, this book examines all aspects of Bonaparte′s spectacular rise.

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Napoleon Bonaparte Book

“What are the best books about Napoleon Bonaparte and the Napoleonic Wars?” We looked at of the top Napoleon books, aggregating and ranking them so. Books shelved as napoleon: Napoleon: A Life by Andrew Roberts, The Campaigns of Napoleon by David G. The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte ( Paperback) by. Napoléon Bonaparte has books on Goodreads with ratings. Napoléon Bonaparte's most popular book is Napoleon's Art of War.

Zeebra Books One of the most written-about of men, Napoleon has been portrayed from his dark side before, usually in frankly partisan books. Schom One Hundred Days: Napoleon's Road to Waterloo , his assiduous new biographer, claims: ""I have attempted to suppress nothing, and have tried to be as impartial as humanly possible. At 30, promising gain to some and glory to many, he ruled France; at 40 now as emperor he controlled much of Europe, resisting advice that he relinquish land for peace, for he had destabilized the continent, fabricating untenable regimes to make royalty of his siblings. Helena Revisited that Napoleon was poisoned by a servant. From the moment Napoleon seized power in November until his defeat at Waterloo in June , he kept Europe in continual war apart from one year, Despite a penchant for the cliche Napoleon's ""mighty new Empire leaked like Swiss cheese"" , this is a gripping, if long, read, although not for hero-worshippers.

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Apr 05, Antigone rated it did not like it Shelves: In retrospect, I think it might be best if a reader knew next to nothing about Napoleon Bonaparte before picking up this book. At eight hundred and eighty-eight pages it is a beast to tackle, and I can testify with confidence that an absence of knowledge will make the effort ever so much easier.

You will lack the means to recognize, for instance, how very many historical truths are being indiscriminately fudged and facts massaged to meet your author's agenda - which, as everyone acknowledges, is In retrospect, I think it might be best if a reader knew next to nothing about Napoleon Bonaparte before picking up this book.

You will lack the means to recognize, for instance, how very many historical truths are being indiscriminately fudged and facts massaged to meet your author's agenda - which, as everyone acknowledges, is a tiring thing to be aware of. When told, for example, that Napoleon "never bothered with maps," you will believe this. You will, perhaps, be unaware of the Corsican's infamous campaign desk which several modern-day furniture outlets have made a fortune reproducing that was spread, night after night, with maps of such bewildering bounty as to keep any number of French cartographers in pinot and pate for life.

You will be unaware of the secretary, the valet, the guard, the unfortunate ambassador or marshal who was summoned into his presence in the wee hours of any given morning to find the little general not simply pouring over such charts but actually crawling atop them to better place his pins. Maps were one of Napoleon's great obsessions - but possession of this knowledge will not serve you well in the reading of this work.

Best to believe what Mr. Schom is desirous for you to believe, that Bonaparte and his one hundred forty-thousand troops simply took to hoof over Europe's many hills and dales until they stumbled across an army to fight.

It would be equally unhelpful, in this regard, to be aware of Napoleon's trademark battle preparations, military intelligence, tactical influences and strategic philosophy, as you will be asked to operate under the firm conviction that he had none.

Great swathes of this book depend upon such ignorance, and it cannot to my eye be truly appreciated by a mind littered with It will also assist you greatly to forget, if you ever owned it to remember, that Monsieurs Barras, Bourrienne and Talleyrand have long been considered suspect sources on the subject of Bonaparte - each owning a rather fearsome axe to grind - and with whom, for reasons that will become apparent in a hot literary second, Mr.

Schom adopts a fraternal bond. And finally, in the interest of providing the most pleasurable reading experience possible, I might advise you to flip your internal gullibility control to its highest setting. While you may manage - although heaven knows how - to get through the first seven hundred and ninety-two pages with your credulity unstretched, the Appendix B "Medical Notes" will, in fact, require this.

That said? Hop to! There's time here you could be wasting! View all 12 comments. Jul 05, Peter Crouse rated it did not like it Shelves: Terrible biography.

Napoleon may have his faults but he deserves a fairer treatment than this. My review is based on less than half of its pages.

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After the chapter on the Imperial coronation turned into a soap opera starring the Bonaparte family, I decided I couldn't go on. The remainder of the book just seemed too imposing. Schom turns Napoleon into an amoral monster, eaten up with ambition. He places unfair emphasis on the Egyptian campaign while belittling Napoleon's victories. He spends t Terrible biography. He spends too much time focusing on the negative side of the Napoleonic regime censorship, heightened police power, A great deal of trouble is also spent bemoaning the lot of the soldier in Napoleon's army while failing to note that those conditions were no different than those anywhere else in Europe.

In some cases, in fact, they would likely have been better. To top it off, the book contains several mistakes in its history and, as I noted above, the style is often too gossipy to be taken seriously. Avoid this biased and untrustworthy account of 'le petit corporal'. View all 5 comments. The writing is good, the annotation sufficient and the subject fascinatingly outrageous. Schom's book has been criticized by John Clubbe of the International Napoleonic Society for being a hatchet job on the emperor.

It certainly is true that Napoleon comes across as no exemplary figure in either his public or private life, but should he?

The guy was, after all, responsible for countless deaths, abysmal misery. While he was, for a time, an agent of modernization in Europe, he did succumb to the very traditional trappings of power in the end, making himself, members of his family and his cronies into a new aristocracy which, with the arguable exception of Louis Napoleon, didn't last very long before being replaced by the reactionaries of the old order.

As a moral tale, Napoleon does appear to be an instance of the corruption encouraged by power. Indeed, the closest modern parallel that comes to my mind as regards his career is Mussolini, another Italian with dreams of grandeur.

Napoleon reads to me as a modern figure in all but one regard. This is to say that he seems accessible, understandable. The one aspect of his life which requires some thinking to comprehend is the very notion of an aristocracy by birth.

Granted, this idea goes back far into antiquity as does the notion that conquerors, because of their victories, prove their virtue and have the right to create new dynasties. In a society of scarcity, when land, passed from father to son, is power, the idea that virtue is inherited makes some sense. Only the rich in such circumstances can afford education, polite manners, romantic idealism.

But after the American, French and Haitian revolutions--not to mention the many "revolutions" inspired by liberating French troops my picture of this, incidentally, is informed by R. Palmer's Age of Democratic Revolutions --it is difficult to see how one in Napoleon's position could revert to apeing the very institutions he had devoted his younger years to combatting without a very bad conscience.

On this score, Napoleon's inner life, the book fell short for me. Jul 01, Mike Prochot rated it really liked it Shelves: While engrossed in early American history and our relations with England from the Revolution through the early 's, a gentleman by the name of Napoleon popped up from time to time.

The details of his career had been left a foggy, distant memory in my subconscious, stashed there years ago sometime early in my college career. Not being a psych undergrad, his M. As I learned then, he was, after all and quite simply, a tyrant bent on world domination.

Apologists While engrossed in early American history and our relations with England from the Revolution through the early 's, a gentleman by the name of Napoleon popped up from time to time. Apologists for his warmongering point to his installation and codification of a set of laws, establishment of schools and "representative" government while ignoring the incalculable numbers of dead, maimed and raped - not to mention the number of destroyed towns, villages and settlements some several times , all accomplished in the name of "liberty".

In any case, I felt it high time to go back to it and get an overview of the man and his world. By the looks of this tome I felt confident that by wading through it, I could get a good perspective of Napoleon's life and times and find out what I had missed by ignoring the man all these years. I very much enjoyed the book - and blew through it in a week while on a very relaxing vacation.

I would have appreciated a few more maps and illustrations, but those that appear within are germane to the story and worked well for me. Some reviewers have accused Alan Schom of not liking Napoleon but while Mr.

Schom does indeed insert some sarcasm in his comments from time to time, I felt more of a sense of the author being flabbergasted at the mix of chance, timing, ruthlessness and paranoia that defines Napoleon's accomplishments - I am reminded of the term "shock and awe" - and this only in reference to Napoleon's audacity.

On the other hand, in regards to Napoleon, what is there to like and why would we need to like him?

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE: England's Prisoner

One can admire his battlefield exploits and his ability to inspire his armies and one may also be impressed by his mastery of subterfuge and depth of vision, but he was most certainly troubled and at the end hated by most of the known world for the misery he left in his wake. Good overview of Napoleon's early life, loves, officer corps, campaign's, political sleight-of-hand, empire building and ultimate self destruction.

The book also gives the reader excellent references for future research on the life and times of Napoleon. Aug 22, Daniel rated it it was ok. This biography has some very good points to it. For example, it devotes entire chapters to Tellyrand and Fouche. However, one thing I hate about so many historians, especially military historians, is to make the losing general in a battle seem like a fool, or the winner just lucky. I've never commanded an army in battle, but I imagine it is a lot harder than armchair general historians appreciate.

Also, this author clearly hates Bonaparte. For sure, there is much to dislike about N. Anyhow, I'm glad to have read this book, as I learned a LOT from it, but the authors style left much to be desired. Only incurable Brit-centric folks who believe in the Corsican Ogre. Are you kidding? No friend of mine. The book has given the National Enquirer, the Globe, the Daily Mail, and every other schlock tabloid a bad name. The book has nothing to do with history.

This book is about an alleged historical figure who never existed as portrayed. This book is a paean to bias and bad scholarship. This book managed to earn a very negative review from Kirkus. Trees died for this book.

Many trees. However, because of its size, it may be used as a doorstop, or its many many pages will keep a privy in service for a The book has given the National Enquirer, the Globe, the Daily Mail, and every other schlock tabloid a bad name. However, because of its size, it may be used as a doorstop, or its many many pages will keep a privy in service for a year.

The author is no historian. He is a spewer of vindictive, unfocused, unscholarly bilge. Sep 01, Windsor rated it did not like it Shelves: Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page.

Napoleon on Napoleon: Somerset De Chair editor. This is an illustrated "autobiography" of the Emperor Napoleon compiled from his commentaries and memoirs dictated on St Helena, edited and put into chronological order.

Napoleon Bonaparte Books

The text spans his childhood in Corsica to exile on St Helena and covers family feuds, divorce from Josephine, retreat from Moscow, Waterloo and more - all in his own words. Napoleon was in inveterate writ This is an illustrated "autobiography" of the Emperor Napoleon compiled from his commentaries and memoirs dictated on St Helena, edited and put into chronological order. Napoleon was in inveterate writer, he dictated obsessively and edited his own scripts.

He was also very aware of his position as one of history's great leaders. The book should be useful to military enthusiasts, historians and writers.

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Napoleon Bonaparte - Reading A-Z

Published September 1st by Cassell first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 1. Friend Reviews.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Napoleon on Napoleon , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. French forces in Southern Germany had been defeated by the Archduke Charles in , but the Archduke withdrew his forces to protect Vienna after learning about Napoleon's assault.

In the first encounter between the two commanders, Napoleon pushed back his opponent and advanced deep into Austrian territory after winning at the Battle of Tarvis in March Bonaparte marched on Venice and forced its surrender, ending 1, years of independence.

He also authorized the French to loot treasures such as the Horses of Saint Mark. He stated later in life:[ when?

Look at Caesar; he fought the first like the last". If he could not use his favourite envelopment strategy , he would take up the central position and attack two co-operating forces at their hinge, swing round to fight one until it fled, then turn to face the other.

He founded two newspapers: one for the troops in his army and another for circulation in France.

His forces also confiscated more than three-hundred priceless paintings and sculptures. This left Barras and his Republican allies in control again but dependent on Bonaparte, who proceeded to peace negotiations with Austria. He decided on a military expedition to seize Egypt and thereby undermine Britain's access to its trade interests in India.

His Egyptian expedition included a group of scientists, with mathematicians, naturalists, chemists, and geodesists among them. Grand Master Ferdinand von Hompesch zu Bolheim surrendered after token resistance, and Bonaparte captured an important naval base with the loss of only three men. General Bonaparte's forces of 25, roughly equalled those of the Mamluks' Egyptian cavalry.

Twenty-nine French [71] and approximately 2, Egyptians were killed.

The Reign Of Napoleon Bonaparte

The victory boosted the morale of the French army. Bonaparte led these 13, French soldiers in the conquest of the coastal towns of Arish , Gaza , Jaffa , and Haifa. Bonaparte discovered that many of the defenders were former prisoners of war, ostensibly on parole , so he ordered the garrison and 1, prisoners to be executed by bayonet or drowning to save bullets. He failed to reduce the fortress of Acre , so he marched his army back to Egypt in May.

To speed up the retreat, Bonaparte ordered plague-stricken men to be poisoned with opium; the number who died remains disputed, ranging from a low of 30 to a high of He also brought out 1, wounded men.

He learned that France had suffered a series of defeats in the War of the Second Coalition. The Republic, however, was bankrupt and the ineffective Directory was unpopular with the French population. Napoleon became "first consul" for ten years, with two consuls appointed by him who had consultative voices only. The constitution preserved the appearance of a republic but in reality established a dictatorship.

Posing the hand inside the waistcoat was often used in portraits of rulers to indicate calm and stable leadership. Napoleon established a political system that historian Martyn Lyons called "dictatorship by plebiscite".

The constitution was approved in a rigged plebiscite held the following January, with

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